Tuesday, August 22, 2017

Postcards from the Lake: Road Trip to Ansel Adams Exhibit

In our family, we have an expression: "I've never seen Petoskey in the sunshine." It's not quite true anymore, but when we were kids at the lake, the minute the skies were gloomy or it was rainy, our moms would pile my cousins and me into the car and we'd head to Petoskey, a charming down on Little Traverse Bay in Northern Michigan.


Well, it was a rainy day -- so off I went to Petoskey! My destination? The Ansel Adams exhibit at Crooked Tree Arts Center.


I've always loved Ansel Adams' work. He just masters the majesty of America's national parks and nature itself.


All the harder, I think, in magnificent black and white -- taking all that startling color and really allowing focus by the use of black and white.


The exhibit, free and running till September 30 for Michigan friends, is well worth the visit. It's beautifully displayed in two rooms -- earlier and later work. Ikebana installations add to the sense of nature.


Crooked Tree is housed in a former church and the stained glass made a lovely accompaniment.


Although, the reflections sometimes changed the look of the photo. I actually like this reflection of the glass in this image of Yosemite's Half Dome. I'm not sure Ansel would!


I was pleased to good documentation on how Adams executed his photos and interested in learning his concept of visualization. I admire that, as when I start something, I'm almost never sure of what it will be when it done!


One of my favorite photographers has an expression -- "I'd rather be lucky than good." (Wally is both!) Ignore the reflection on this one -- one of the artists' most famous.


And this description of the importance of good timing and the element of chance.



We all have our favorites and although I am not a winter person, I sure loved the light on this one!


It was fascinating to learn that Adams didn't get everything right straight out of the box. Take a look at the one above and see what he did.



And this Buddhist cemetery was far more dramatic than my photo shows. I love the rainbow.


Another nice element of this exhibit was a display of cameras from the era...


...and before.


Also included was a juried show of contemporary artists interpreting America's National Parks.


One feels confident that while Adams' days have passed, there are many other artists who are committed to sharing the beauty of our parks.


If you are in the region -- of it this show comes your way, I'd heartily recommend it.


Even if it's not a rainy day!

24 comments:

Joyful said...

Beautiful!

Valerie-Jael said...

Beautiful exhibition, and great to see the old cameras, too. Hugs, Valerie

Lynne said...

How can one not enjoy and benefit from a visit to see Ansel Adams magic . . .
I will have to remember that "visualization thought" with my watercolor . . .
Very fine rainy day visit . . .

eileeninmd said...

Hello, I would love the Ansel Adams exhibit. I love his photos and his great quotes. America's parks are the best, I hope they stay natural. Beautiful photos and post. Thanks for sharing your visit. Happy Wednesday, enjoy your day!

Joanne Huffman said...

I have always loved his photos.I like the visualization process - I should start using it.

Rita C. said...

Very nice, thank you for sharing.

The French Hutch said...

Stunning is how I describe his work. Thanks Jeanie for the tour for those of us who can't get there to see the exhibit. I enjoyed seeing the cameras as well......happy day.

Barbara said...

Ansel Adams is a favourite of mine too. I have a book of his some place as well. It is so nice to see his photographic artistry again.

Castles Crowns and Cottages said...

I am validated; poetry and photography, my two chosen pursuits, go hand in hand. It's a reaction. Like the poetry Mary Oliver titled one of her poems, "The real prayers are not the words, but the attention that comes first." So, our reaction to the world around us is of utmost importance whether you're pressing a button or typing out words. It requires our attention. We are the recorders and the messengers. Oh what a lesson to constantly learn.

Pam Richardson said...

Beautiful work! I love black and white photography. He is definitely a favorite of mine! Thanks so much Jeanie for this delightful exhibit!

Jeanne Washburn said...

I always wondered if Adams manipulated his photos in the darkroom...interesting...I love that he saw the finished photo before he took it. Thanks for a fun tour.

My name is Erika. said...

I've seen Ansel Adams works years ago in Portland, Maine. They are amazing photographs for sure. I enjoyed the visit again today. Not sure if I had seen those photos or not, but the Manzar one is amazing. I also but there were some amazing ones of the National Parks too. I'm a huge National Park fan. :) Glad you shared, and hope you are having fun in Quebec. Hugs-Erika

Lisa from Lisa's Yarns said...

It's good to have a rainy day destination when you are at the lake. Sometimes it's nice to be forced to stay inside and take it easy but it's nice to have a place to escape to! That exhibit looked beautiful. I have such a love for our National Park and he captured them so beautifully. I'm glad the torch has been passed to other talented artists!

Mary@mydogsmygardenandmary said...

Beautiful pictures, thanks so much for sharing.

Mary

Red Rose Alley said...

Jeanie, I became familiar with Ansel Adams when I took a black and white Photography class. My teacher talked about him and his portraits. What a nice exhibit this is, and look at that old camera! I love that first quote, did he write that?

~Sheri

I need orange said...

What an interesting exhibit! Thank you for taking us along. :-)

Jenny Woolf said...

It looks like a wonderful show. I love Ansel Adams and it's time I revisited his work. I don't suppose it will get over here, but I have a couple of photo exhibitions I do want to see in London anyhow!

Pam Jackson said...

Amazing photographer. Love his work. Thanks for sharing.

Stacey said...

This sounds like fun and mind expanding. Do you know that we have all kinds of museums here in Dallas and we rarely go. We need to pay more attention to what's out there. :)

Marilyn Miller said...

He is one of my all time favorite photographers. How special for you to be able to visit this exhibit.

shoreacres said...

I wonder how his concept of visualization would have changed, had he met the world of digital photography. Given the realities of film photography, particularly the expense of film, it makes sense that more attention and less easy clicking would make sense. After all, any of us who've experienced both worlds have said at least once, "I never took so many photos when I was still using film, because I couldn't afford to have them developed." Sometimes, what seem grand theories are at least partly a result of practicality.

Have you ever seen his Los Angeles photos? He did a good bit of urban photography there before moving to nature photography. If you've not seen the series, I'll send you the link. The best photo in the series? An Ansel Adams double exposure in a bowling alley!

Sketchbook Wandering said...

What a fantastic show...His photographs are sort of other wordly...Our National Parks are a treasure of this United States, which is very troubled in this era...

I recently read something somewhere else about visualizing a painting before actually painting...

Mary K.- The Boondocks Blog said...

I would have loved to have been there. I've had a fascination with Ansel Adams since I was young. I even tried my hand at taking color photos and making them black and white once. The effect was astounding. Respect for the man and his artistry.

Danielle L Zecher said...

There was an Ansel Adams exhibit at the Upcountry History Museum in Greenville, SC that we were able to go see in April. It was great! It sounds like the exhibit you saw had more than the one we did, but I agree with going to see his exhibits if they come to a museum near you.

The stained glass windows are gorgeous! The modern photos of the National Parks look great, too. It's nice that people are still photographing them.

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